Sunday, December 11, 2005

Blogorrhea

logorrhea \law-guh-REE-uh\, noun: Excessive talkativeness or wordiness.

Is blogging a symptom of digital logorrhea? Is it just a coincidence that logorrhea has the same suffix as another word describing excessive excretion from the other end of the alimentary tract? Do bloggers all have in common the need to expel and distribute their words out into the ethers rather than contain them in a journal gathering dust on the literal or digital shelf?

If anyone is guilty of this disease of words, it would be me, but in these days of media saturation and 24-hour news coverage, aren't we all unwilling subjects to such daily non-stop discourse? Blogging is the way for someone like myself to instantly publish and receive feedback, eschewing the need for editors, middle-men, agents, publishers, and the like. If an individual feels that there are just too many blogs and too many opinions floating around on the Net, then they can just surf on over to eBay and shop for vegetable peelers and lederhosen.

If blogging is a type of logorrhea---let's call it "Bloghorrhea", shall we?---then I vote for no verbal Imodium to be administered to stop its emission. The stream of words produced by bloggers is some of the freshest, most personal writing available (for free, no less!) to anyone with the curiosity to seek it out.

While I say this with all certainty, I also frequently question my own need to blog, to wear my heart on my sleeve, to share of my daily experience and revel in the fact of the dozens of pageloads which my site enjoys each week. It's simply a need to connect, to feel part of something larger, and to feel that there is a community of people out there who find some succor or interest in what I have to say. Some might see it as an exercise in mental masturbation and self-aggrandizement. This may be true, but I also see it as a vehicle for self-disclosure and self-discovery. And again, those who find my writing unnecessarily boring or redundant, are free to surf on by with nary a wave or nod.

As a nurse, I find a certain satisfaction in creating positive and self-reflective writing which portrays the reality of nursing, not just the media's view of what a nurse should be. Encouraged by the brilliance of Suzanne Gordon's new book, Nursing Against the Odds: How Health Care Cost Cutting, Media Stereotypes and Medical Hubris Undermine Nurses and Patient Care, I am emboldened to portray nurses---and men in nursing---as more than just the butt of jokes suffered by the male nurse portrayed by Ben Stiller in Meet the Parents.

So, if my blogorrhea is tiresome to some readers, I'm still proud and delighted to have such a democratic venue in which to air my opinions and thoughts. It is an enjoyable conceit, and I'm happily cruising towards my one-year anniversary in January. As Bob Marley once sang, "I've got so much things to say right now, so much things to say". And the probability of that changing is probably fairly slim at this point in time.

Blogorrhea, ad nauseum.
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